Geographic Locations

Lobster Pound, Hancock

Lobster pounds are fenced off areas of water where lobsters can be stored while awaiting transportation or a better market. In this 1926 view of a Hancock, Maine, lobster pound, the fence can be seen; men in the foreground are netting up lobsters which can be stored in compartments in the float they are standing on to make them easier to retrieve for shipping. Many lobster pounds are quite large and need boats so that the operator can get around. Here they have a few dories and also a winch set up to help haul in a net.

Lobster Fishing from a Dory

Lobster fishing from a dory. Note that the header, or the net opening for lobsters to enter the trap, is at the end of the trap rather than on the sides. There is a mackerel seine boat in the background, steered with a steering oar, along with a nest of more seine boats. In the background a number of fishing schooners lie along a fish pier. This photograph was likely staged, and was taken in Gloucester Harbor, Massachusetts.

Drying Fish, Bucksport

Summer visitors to Bucksport could buy this postcard showing fish drying at Nicholson's Wharf, Bucksport, Maine. Thomas Nicholson was one of Maine's last Grand Banks cod fishing schooner owners. By the time of this postcard, this was a rare sight. After processing, cod were salted and dried on fish flakes. Once dry, the fish were packaged for shipment. Dried salted cod could keep for well over a year.

The Sardine Industry

Shore herring weir near Eastport, Maine. This is the common form of brush weir. Poles driven into the bottom and interlaced with brush guide the herring into a trap from which they can be netted. This image is from G. Brown Goode's The Fisheries and Fishery Industries of the United States, 1884-1887, Section V, Plate 128. The book can be found on line at: http://celebrating200years.noaa.gov/rarebooks/fisheries/welcome.html

Fish Flakes, Friendship

Fish flakes in Friendship, Maine. After processing, cod were salted and dried on fish flakes or drying racks. These racks were a common feature in Maine fishing towns. Once dry, the fish was packaged for shipment. Dried salted cod could keep for well over a year.

These flakes are near the water's edge. There is a lobster car (float with compartments to hold live lobsters) pulled up on shore next to it as well as a small boat pulled up on a ramp. Like most coastal towns in the late 19th century most of the tree cover had long since been cut down.

Brigadier's Island 1770

Brigadier's Island is now called Sears Island. It is in Searsport and is the largest undeveloped island on the Maine coast. It was the site of trouble against proprietor Henry Knox in the early 1800s. A causeway now links it to the main land.

From J.F.W.DesBarres atlas The Atlantic Neptune of 1770.

Castine 1770

The Bagaduce River and Penobscot Bay around what is now Castine is where the Penobscot Expedition attempted to capture the British fortifications in 1779. The attempt failed miserably, and the effort is considered by many to be the worst naval disaster in American history up to the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

This image is from J.F.W. DesBarres atlas Atlantic Neptune of 1770.

Bowles' Map of New England ca.1765

Bowles' New One-Sheet Map of New England, Boston, was based on well-known British cartographer Thomas Jeffery's Map of the Most Inhabited Part of New England which appeared in various editions from 1744 to 1755. This one sheet reduction of Jeffery's map dates to about 1765.

The Osher Map Library of the University of Southern Maine has a web based exhibit on the work of Jeffery, whose maps were critical to the American Revolution. 

Major 18th Century Land Claims in Maine

The major 18th century land claims in Maine.

From the book The Lobster Coast: Rebels, Rusticators, and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier by Colin Woodard, published by Viking in 2004. Map drawn by Jojo Gragasin. Map used by permission of the author.

Eastern New England 1730

Eastern New England in 1730 shows Sagahadoc and Nova Scotia as Crown Colonies.

From book, The Lobster Coast: Rebels, Rusticators, and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier by Colin Woodard, published by Viking in 2004. Map drawn by Jojo Gragasin. Map used by permission of the author.

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