Photo/Image

Captain James P. Butman

Capt. Butman was captain of the Searsport-built ship William H. Conner in 1891, which was but one of eight local vessels to sail to Australia just in the first quarter of 1889.

Bangalore at Bayonne, NJ

British ship Bangalore, Captain Ray D. Congdon, 1893. The ship is loading at Tide Water Oil Works, Bayonne, with 65,000 cases of "case oil" for Calcutta. Case oil is kerosene, shipped in wooden "cases," a frame that held two 5-gallon tins of oil.

She was an iron ship built in England in 1886 and sold to the Maine Navigation Company in 1899 whereupon she was put under US registry and continued in the case oil trade.

From 1900 to 1908, the Bangalore was commanded by Captain Phineas Banning Blanchard of Searsport.

Commodore Perry Meeting the Imperial Commissioner at Yokohama

Engraving from Narrative of the Expedition of an American Squadron to the China Seas and Japan, performed in the years 1852, 1853, and 1854, under the command of Commodore M.C. Perry, United States Navy, 1856.

View of Old China Street, Canton

While Commodore Matthew Perry is best known for his two visits to Japan, he also spent time in China.

Engraving from Narrative of the Expedition of an American Squadron to the China Seas and Japan, performed in the years 1852, 1853, and 1854, under the command of Commodore M.C. Perry, United States Navy, 1856.

Boatbuilder Gus Skoog at Planer

Gus Skoog built more than 80 boats, mostly lobster boats measuring more than 28 feet long, and another 30 smaller boats. He worked from the 1950s to the 1970s in his Vinalhaven shop. He worked until he was 88.

North Haven Dinghies on Mill River

The Mill River Race is a North Haven dinghy favorite. Starting in the Fox Islands Thorofare between North Haven and Vinalhaven, the course runs first through open coves then into an intricate network of ledges and islands in the narrow Mill River to a turning mark at a bridge at its head, then a different route to return. It can only be sailed at high water as most of the course is over tidal flats.

Launch of Dragger Hilda and Helen

Hilda and Helen was a 40-foot fishing vessel, built by Padebco Boats of Round Pond, Maine. Set up as a small dragger, one of her size was designed for inshore banks rather than off shore banks like Georges Bank. In 1967, there was still an inshore dragging industry; now there is not.

Launch of Steamer Tremont

This shows the launching of the steamer Tremont at the Barbour Yard in Brewer in 1895. She sailed for the Bangor and Bar Harbor Steam Boat Company.

Steamer Sedgwick under Construction

The steamer Sedgwick was built at the Barbour Yard in Brewer in 1892, to carry passengers from Bangor to towns on the Eggemoggin Reach. Barbour was one of few Penobscot Bay area shipbuilders to build steam vessels in the nineteenth century.

Six-Masted Schooner George W. Wells

 

The George W. Wells was the first 6-masted schooner built. The first image shows her after her 1900 launch at the H.M. Bean yard wharf in Camden, after she has been outfitted for sea. Sails are bent onto the yards and gaffs.The working sloop swinging at a mooring alongside, probably only about 35 feet long, shows off the tremendous size of the 320-foot schooner. The second image shows her before her sails are bent on, with the last of the rigging underway.

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