Photo/Image

Mast Ships

llustration of the mast ships and the preparation of their loading. Ports in the ends of the ships allowed mast timbers to be slid into the ship without shortening them. These ports would be closed and caulked shut after the cargo was loaded.

From the book, New England Masts and the King's Broad Arrow, by Samuel F. Manning, 1979. Illustrations courtesy of the author and illustrator.

The King's Broad Arrow

A timber surveyor and his crew cutting the King's Broad Arrow mark into a large white pine tree, marking it to be reserved for the British Royal Navy.

From the book, New England Masts and the King's Broad Arrow, by Samuel F. Manning, 1979. Illustrations courtesy of the author and illustrator.

Felling a Mast Tree

Felling a white pine tree. Smaller trees have been cut and their boughs and trunks laid for a soft landing for the mast tree.

It's hard to imagine trees this size today, and even harder to imagine cutting them down without chain saws. It took sharp axes and strong men.

From the book, New England Masts and the King's Broad Arrow, by Samuel F. Manning, 1979. Illustrations courtesy of the author and illustrator.

The Codfish

Illustration of the Atlantic Cod from G. Brown Goode's The Fisheries and Fishery Industries of the United States, 1887, Section I, Plates volume, plate 58A.

Basque Whaling, 1575

Fishing for cod, the Basques found whales. For at least fifty years--to about 1600--Basque whalers prospered in the Labarador whale fishery, sending over 15 ships and 600 men a season. At 700 tons, these were many times larger than vessels like the Mayflower. One has been found in Red Bay, Labrador (the San Juan of 1565) and has been excavated.

On the Taking of Whales, Andre Thevet 1575 Library of Congress

James Rosier, "A True Relation..." 1605

The title page shows the book's name to be "A True Relation of the most prosperous voyage made this present year 1605 by Captaine George Waymouth in the Discovery of the land of Virginia," 1605, by James Rosier.

This is the first extensive English account describing the residents of Maine.

Fort Point Hotel, Stockton Springs

Fort Point Hotel was originally built as the Wassaumkeag Hotel, and later also called Fort Point House and The Woodcliff. It was built in 1895 and burned in 1898. It was the largest resort hotel in the area, but the owners lost money. Its foundations are visible at the Fort Point State Park, also the location of the Fort Point lighthouse.

Beals Wharf, Southwest Harbor

Tied up at Beals Wharf are the lobsterboat Ethel M. II and the sardine carrier Woiee. In 1955, there was still an active sardine canning industry; now the few surviving sardine carriers are used to carry bait. Woiee, built in 1918, was converted to a motor sailing ketch used as charter yacht.

Playing Tennis at Union Hall, Searsport

Tennis was a popular sport a hundred years ago, as it is now. Costumes have changed. The tennis court was next to Searsport's Union Hall.

Sunday School Class, First Congregational Church, Searsport

This photo of the Sunday School class was taken on the yard of the Jeremiah Merrithew house, next door to the First Congregational Church in Searsport. The brick building on the left was the Searsport Town Hall, built in 1845. This and the building behind it are now both part of the Penobscot Marine Museum.

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